Read The Water of Life: Initiation and the Tempering of the Soul by Michael Meade Online

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Starting with a new preface that describes the dual nightmares of global terror and global warming, The Water of Life addresses meaning and purpose in personal life and the need to return culture to its mythic context. Meade is a masterful storyteller with a genius for metaphorical thinking; he draws on the power of myths, fairy tales, and his own personal story of descentStarting with a new preface that describes the dual nightmares of global terror and global warming, The Water of Life addresses meaning and purpose in personal life and the need to return culture to its mythic context. Meade is a masterful storyteller with a genius for metaphorical thinking; he draws on the power of myths, fairy tales, and his own personal story of descent and transformation during the Vietnam War. At once a mythic journey, a study in depth psychology, and a treatise on initiation The Water of Life addresses the roots of conflict, the recurring hunger for war and the issues of reducing the warrior. Throughout the text the water of life functions as the core symbol for both personal and cultural renewal, and redemption in the spiritual wasteland. Using ideas gleaned from many years working with youth and communities at-risk Meade s writing rings with the echoes of truth and sings with an incantational voice that takes you right to the edge of elemental knowledge....

Title : The Water of Life: Initiation and the Tempering of the Soul
Author :
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ISBN : 9780976645047
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 396 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

The Water of Life: Initiation and the Tempering of the Soul Reviews

  • Largercircle
    2019-01-30 17:44

    This book also took me a long time to read (like the last book I blogged about). But this time it was because this book is incredibly rich, like the dense gingerbread cake I made this week, with nuggets of intensity in it, like the dried cranberries I stirred into the cake. I could only read a little at a time, just like there's still a lot of cake left because I can only eat a small piece at a time.There are lots of bits of this book I love and want to come back to in different ways in different contexts. (Some to note: "The Spell", pp. 88 - 91; )I think as a mother of sons, it will inform my view of their needs as boys and becoming men. The direct application to working with fathers and fathers to be as a childbirth and parenting mentor is not so obvious to me, but I'm sure it is there and will come out.One thing I noticed was how drawn I was to the stories in the book that came straight from the author's experience. Much of the time he talks in general about how various men react to the stories (folk-tales) that form the skeleton of the book, and that's valuable and useful. But what really caught my attention were the few direct stories where he spoke in the first person about his own life. That gives me pause as I think about how I use stories with parents (and others in my other roles in life). We are told not to share our own experiences, or if we do, to camouflage them as someone else's. I understand why; it can be hard for someone to hear truth if it's about me, especially if they have any issues with authority figures or women or whatever. But on the other hand, I think sometimes it is a betrayal of the role of mentor or elder not to claim my own experience, share it for what it is, and then allow those who are listening to make of it what they will. The old stories, the archetypal stories, are extremely powerful in part because they let people see themselves in whatever part of the story they need to at that moment when they are listening. Personal stories, elders' stories, are also powerful and sometimes perhaps we should share them. The middle ground, the framing, is not so powerful (albeit useful and important to do, with light brushstrokes.)

  • Elizabeth
    2019-02-12 16:23

    borrowed from library, 1 Feb. 2014 and kept till Mar 30 read to p302see alsohttp://www.mosaicvoices.org/fascinatingreferenced in LoEThe Language of Emotions: What Your Feelings Are Trying to Tell Youp302 men in prison with high testost are excessivly aggressive and violent lower their test levels by "deep convulsive weeping"--also men with low T levels raise their levels by weepingWhy Only Humans Weep: Unravelling the Mysteries of TearsTitle: Tears vs testosterone Source: India Today. (Jan. 31, 2011): From General OneFile. Document Type: Brief article Source Citation (MLA 7th Edition) "Tears vs testosterone." India Today 31 Jan. 2011. General OneFile. Web. 31 Mar. 2014.Document URLhttp://go.galegroup.com/ps/i.do?id=GA...Gale Document Number: GALE|A248077274 ----------------- Results for Basic Search Keyword (testosterone And crying) Title: Crying mellows some, masculinizes others Author(s): Jeffrey L. Fox Source: Psychology Today. 19 (Feb. 1985): p14. From General OneFile. Document Type: Article Source Citation (MLA 7th Edition) Fox, Jeffrey L. "Crying mellows some, masculinizes others." Psychology Today Feb. 1985: 14. General OneFile. Web. 31 Mar. 2014.Document URLhttp://go.galegroup.com/ps/i.do?id=GA...Gale Document Number: GALE|A3622484 IN a lot of places this book is identical to WofL Men but with ref to brothers and sisters--simply the addition of the femaledefinitely he indicates that men have the two ego brothers and the youngest brother in each of them and that women have the similiar sisters in them but does this mean a gender neutral understanding of sisters and brothers or do we all have the brothers and the sisters in each of us--all six of the archtypes in each of us???? mar 30 14I'm going back to reading WoL men because it's more available. next time I am going to make a list of pages where the men or the men/women dynamic might be clarified

  • Dave
    2019-01-26 19:38

    This is brilliant and introspective. The author guides you and teaches you to become a better reader and develop better understanding of self. The stories themselves are worth reading. A great diagnoses for our cultural sickness.This is one of the best quotes:"if the fires that innately burn inside youth are not intentionally and lovingly added to the heart of the community, then they will burn down the structures of culture just to feel the warmth" This is a good follow up to Joseph Campbell's Hero with a Thousand Faces.

  • Stephanie
    2019-01-19 18:16

    This book uses ancient myths as vessels to share perspectives on initiations for men in our modern-day culture and weaves in stories from the author's own life and from the retreats he has held. The story analysis can be long and cumbersome at times, but it is worth reading through to the end. Meade writes from a passion for and understanding of the needs of the masculine soul in American culture, and the wisdom of long experience seeps through in every page.

  • Baxter Trautman
    2019-02-15 14:40

    Takes old folk tales (African and Celtic) and uses them to illustrate the rites of passage adolescents (especially boys) must go through. "We find our true self by becoming lost."