Read Drinkwater: A Sobering Tale About A Medieval Knight by Otto Scamfer Online

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This epic adventure begins in England in the twelfth century. It covers several traumatic months in the life of Winston Tabor, a young nobleman, who is well known in his village for being an irresponsible drunkard. When his father is murdered and he is framed for the crime, Winston's world is turned upside down. His life becomes a whirlwind of action and adventure as he seThis epic adventure begins in England in the twelfth century. It covers several traumatic months in the life of Winston Tabor, a young nobleman, who is well known in his village for being an irresponsible drunkard. When his father is murdered and he is framed for the crime, Winston's world is turned upside down. His life becomes a whirlwind of action and adventure as he seeks to prove his innocence and avenge the murder of his father. To fulfill his goal, he duels with swordsmen, battles on horseback, and earns the honor of knighthood. At the same time he must find a way to come to grips with his unrelenting desire for ale, which has controlled him for most of his life. Last of all, he is compelled to prove to a beautiful young peasant girl, who comes to own his heart, that he is worthy of her love. Will he succeed in his quest, or will he die with his last breath reeking of ale?...

Title : Drinkwater: A Sobering Tale About A Medieval Knight
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9781438234915
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 174 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Drinkwater: A Sobering Tale About A Medieval Knight Reviews

  • Kevis Hendrickson
    2019-01-21 17:29

    Drinkwater: A Sobering Tale of a Medieval Knight by Otto Scamfer is one of the best books I've had the pleasure to read in a long time. It is a sheer delight to have discovered this fine gem in a sea of mediocrity. Over the years, I have grown cynical about the books I read. Even some of the better books I've read seem to take themselves too seriously or not serious enough, resulting in a reading experience that is often hit-and-miss. It is rare that a book moves me from the very first page. But...more Drinkwater: A Sobering Tale of a Medieval Knight by Otto Scamfer is one of the best books I've had the pleasure to read in a long time. It is a sheer delight to have discovered this fine gem in a sea of mediocrity. Over the years, I have grown cynical about the books I read. Even some of the better books I've read seem to take themselves too seriously or not serious enough, resulting in a reading experience that is often hit-and-miss. It is rare that a book moves me from the very first page. But from the start, I knew Drinkwater was going to be a memorable read.Drinkwater is the story of an alcoholic young man named Winston Tabor who has lost his status as a knight-in-training and succumbed to depression. One evening, as he is leaving the local tavern in a drunken stupor, he is attacked and nearly killed by his father's enemy. Upon surviving his grievous injuries, he discovers that he has been framed for his father's murder. Winston is hunted by the law and is forced to remain in hiding even while he deals with his overwhelming addiction to drink. The story that follows is one of hope, courage, and redemption.I am very impressed with this book and find myself constantly recommending it to others. Not only is this book well-written, but it also has a positive message, one I might add it does without being overly preachy. The best praise that I can give this book is to say that it is very rare for me to find a book that I enjoy without fault. There was never a single moment during my reading where I found myself bored by what was going on or speed reading to get past meaningless text. Every scene flowed easily into the next, making reading this book an thoroughly enjoyable one.Needless to say, I will be following the career of Mr. Scamfer and look forward to seeing what else his furtive mind can conjur up. If his other books are even half as interesting as Drinkwater, then the future will bode well for us lucky readers.

  • Kevis Hendrickson
    2019-01-03 18:24

    Drinkwater: A Sobering Tale of a Medieval Knight by Otto Scamfer is one of the best books I've had the pleasure to read in a long time. It is a sheer delight to have discovered this fine gem in a sea of mediocrity. Over the years, I have grown cynical about the books I read. Even some of the better books I've read seem to take themselves too seriously or not serious enough, resulting in a reading experience that is often hit-and-miss. It is rare that a book moves me from the very first page. But from the start, I knew Drinkwater was going to be a memorable read.Drinkwater is the story of an alcoholic young man named Winston Tabor who has lost his status as a knight-in-training and succumbed to depression. One evening, as he is leaving the local tavern in a drunken stupor, he is attacked and nearly killed by his father's enemy. Upon surviving his grievous injuries, he discovers that he has been framed for his father's murder. Winston is hunted by the law and is forced to remain in hiding even while he deals with his overwhelming addiction to drink. The story that follows is one of hope, courage, and redemption. I am very impressed with this book and find myself constantly recommending it to others. Not only is this book well-written, but it also has a positive message, one I might add it does without being overly preachy. The best praise that I can give this book is to say that it is very rare for me to find a book that I enjoy without fault. There was never a single moment during my reading where I found myself bored by what was going on or speed reading to get past meaningless text. Every scene flowed easily into the next, making reading this book an thoroughly enjoyable one.Needless to say, I will be following the career of Mr. Scamfer and look forward to seeing what else his furtive mind can conjur up. If his other books are even half as interesting as Drinkwater, then the future will bode well for us lucky readers.

  • S.T. Young
    2019-01-20 22:39

    A knight’s tale of old.With “Drinkwater”, Scamfer has chosen the less popular format of the 1st person narrative, which I found somewhat daunting when I first started reading his story. Though I have read my fair share of the genre, both medieval and 1st person narrative, it has been years.I found myself to be pleasantly surprised by both the tale and the writing style of this first time author, however. The story was engaging from the start, telling the story of young Winston who is dealing with particularly nasty habit of being dependant on alcoholic drinks, in a time where fermented drinks were really the only safe thing to consume.I thought it to be a charming angle into the entire theme, (alcoholism as much as the era) and while reading about Winston’s view of life I found myself to be vastly engaged as he started on his road towards complete sobriety and all its pitfalls along the way. Throughout the pages I could actually feel the way he struggled with his own weaknesses and was pleased to see that throughout the tale he became stronger than even he expected.Scamfer managed to combine sensitivity with honor excellently, circumventing certain clichés that most stories about this era possess, and creating a rather fresh view on a male protagonist. He was liberal in describing he hero’s faults and doubts, not taking heed of the “alpha male” stigma, which is so very popular these days: Just honest human emotions with all their little pitfalls.The villain:Though there certainly is one in this tale, the villain serves more as a drive for the main protagonist than anything. The evil doings perpetrated by this character force Winston to become a better man and sets him on a journey into a world of many dangers while he is battling his demons without success…at first.There is a strong sense of comradeship as the young hero finds support and schooling in the shapes of a variety of characters, which makes Drinkwater an entertaining read for most anyone.Male bonding–once again without the clichés–hints at a sensitive writer who believes in the basic goodness of humanity, and shows as much in his story.Romance: Being a rather avid romance reader, I found the tale a little short on the romance part, but that doesn’t matter since this is more about a young man’s journey into life, than anything else. It is present on the outskirts but certainly not the main aspect in the tale.Violence: For those who are into graphic imagery of this particular feature, Drinkwater will do just fine. Scamfer managed to capture the brutality of battle in the times of old very well, and does not shy away from describing it in detail; giving a clear picture of the ways battles were waged. Excellently done.Still the main focus of the story keeps circling back to surmounting a bad habit, and the growth of a spoiled young man, striving for mature adulthood…while smartly accepting the help of wise and kind people along the way.This was described in a pleasing and comprehensive fashion.I find Scamfer’s writing voice (style) to be simple in a most charming way.Nothing too complex, which is good in a 1st person narrative, since it makes it feel more personal, and keeping the storyline basic and in-style with the old Robin Hood tales and such.For those who are searching for full-blown romance, as in: boy meets girl, they fall in instant lust, and live happily ever after, (or whichever sequence you prefer) this is not what you should read.If, however, you have a yearning for the old-fashioned, budding love on the fringes without all the graphic images that belong to modern day romances, you will certainly enjoy Drinkwater.Conclusion:A simple and clean-cut story that will engage many readers. I had a lot of fun going through Scamfer’s story. His easy-to-follow narrative allowed me to relax and just enjoy myself, so I will gladly recommend it to anyone who wishes to spend a few hours relaxing, and just lounge back to…READ.

  • S.T. Young
    2018-12-27 19:36

    A knight’s tale of old.With “Drinkwater”, Scamfer has chosen the less popular format of the 1st person narrative, which I found somewhat daunting when I first started reading his story. Though I have read my fair share of the genre, both medieval and 1st person narrative, it has been years.I found myself to be pleasantly surprised by both the tale and the writing style of this first time author, however. The story was engaging from the start, telling the story of young Winston who is dealing with particularly nasty habit of being dependant on alcoholic drinks, in a time where fermented drinks were really the only safe thing to consume.I thought it to be a charming angle into the entire theme, (alcoholism as much as the era) and while reading about Winston’s view of life I found myself to be vastly engaged as he started on his road towards complete sobriety and all its pitfalls along the way. Throughout the pages I could actually feel the way he struggled with his own weaknesses and was pleased to see that throughout the tale he became stronger than even he expected.Scamfer managed to combine sensitivity with honor excellently, circumventing certain clichés that most stories about this era possess, and creating a rather fresh view on a male protagonist. He was liberal in describing he hero’s faults and doubts, not taking heed of the “alpha male” stigma, which is so very popular these days: Just honest human emotions with all their little pitfalls.The villain:Though there certainly is one in this tale, the villain serves more as a drive for the main protagonist than anything. The evil doings perpetrated by this character force Winston to become a better man and sets him on a journey into a world of many dangers while he is battling his demons without success…at first.There is a strong sense of comradeship as the young hero finds support and schooling in the shapes of a variety of characters, which makes Drinkwater an entertaining read for most anyone.Male bonding–once again without the clichés–hints at a sensitive writer who believes in the basic goodness of humanity, and shows as much in his story.Romance: Being a rather avid romance reader, I found the tale a little short on the romance part, but that doesn’t matter since this is more about a young man’s journey into life, than anything else. It is present on the outskirts but certainly not the main aspect in the tale.Violence: For those who are into graphic imagery of this particular feature, Drinkwater will do just fine. Scamfer managed to capture the brutality of battle in the times of old very well, and does not shy away from describing it in detail; giving a clear picture of the ways battles were waged. Excellently done.Still the main focus of the story keeps circling back to surmounting a bad habit, and the growth of a spoiled young man, striving for mature adulthood…while smartly accepting the help of wise and kind people along the way.This was described in a pleasing and comprehensive fashion.I find Scamfer’s writing voice (style) to be simple in a most charming way.Nothing too complex, which is good in a 1st person narrative, since it makes it feel more personal, and keeping the storyline basic and in-style with the old Robin Hood tales and such.For those who are searching for full-blown romance, as in: boy meets girl, they fall in instant lust, and live happily ever after, (or whichever sequence you prefer) this is not what you should read.If, however, you have a yearning for the old-fashioned, budding love on the fringes without all the graphic images that belong to modern day romances, you will certainly enjoy Drinkwater.Conclusion:A simple and clean-cut story that will engage many readers. I had a lot of fun going through Scamfer’s story. His easy-to-follow narrative allowed me to relax and just enjoy myself, so I will gladly recommend it to anyone who wishes to spend a few hours relaxing, and just lounge back to…READ.

  • Benjamin Thomas
    2019-01-12 23:49

    This is a book that was given to me by the author in return for a review. The basic story, about a medieval knight-in-training who has been a drunkard most of his life, is cute. It's basic and it is written to formula. There are three distinct acts, the action is plotted over those three acts like clockwork, and we have all of the elements of textbook story-telling. So much so that I kept hoping for something to shake up the predictable plot. But to no avail. Of course the hero will overcome his destructive drinking habits and become a "drinkwater." Of course he will be bested by a bully in the first few pages and spend the rest of the book fulfilling his thirst for revenge. Of course he will fall in love with a low-born peasant girl and despite his own high birth, win her just before she marries the bully from scene one. And of course he will gain such fabulous combat skills with sword and lance (from an Obi-Wan type mentor that is killed at the end of act one) that he can defeat the evil "dark lord" who has been the reigning champion for years and years (and who has no relevance to the plot otherwise). Have we seen this before?The title would suggest that overcoming his drinking problem would be the protagonist's central battle. But this is largely resolved in the first 30 pages or so. He only falls off the wagon once during the rest of the book but even that is still in Act one and so the suspense is over for that particular plot thread. Then it becomes a revenge/take my rightful place story. It's too bad. I think the author has potential to write well. The book did read evenly and easily; it was clear and easy to understand. I would promote it to the young adult market if it were my book although I first came across it as an "adventure" story in the Amazon forums. There are some scenes that depict the bloody results of a sword fight, etc. but otherwise it is pretty innocent. It's published by what looks to be a small press but it could be self-published. There were several glaring grammatical errors but I understand most small press publishers don't do much, if any, editing, forcing the author to do all of it.I do hope the author continues to write as I suspect he has learned much from writing this one and future novels will be better and better.

  • Kara Jorges
    2018-12-30 20:39

    Winston Tabor may be the son of a lord, but he’s also the village drunk. The day his father is murdered and he is blamed, he becomes a fugitive. After an encounter with his father’s murderer leaves him near death, however, he is rescued in more ways than one by an old hermit who lives in the woods. Under the old man’s tutelage, Winston starts on a new journey of self respect and purpose, falls in love, makes many new friends, and plans his vengeance against the evil blackguard, Cyrus, who had taken everything from him.This is a sweet novel with heart, also brimming with adventure, as Winston matures in many ways. His tests and challenges are not always physical, and not always about his battle with alcoholism. Poignantly, there are some sad episodes in Winston’s life attributable to his drunkenness that will always haunt him, but he is able to forgive himself and move forward. As he finds his way in his new, sober life, the forces of evil are at work back in his home village of Dereham, and he will need to face his greatest fears in order to win the day.Though Winston’s circumstances are suspiciously like Hamlet’s, I found him a lot less whiny, and he has a story of his own. There is murder and mayhem in this medieval story, but the violence is not graphic, and I would feel comfortable recommending it to everyone from my teenage nephew to my thriller-loving friends. The characters have strong morals, the language is inoffensive, and the action scenes are exciting. It’s a self-published book with a few spelling and grammatical snafus, but I’ve seen much worse from many major publishers of late. I enjoyed this book from beginning to end and look forward to seeing more titles by this author.

  • Marva
    2019-01-05 23:51

    This was an entertaining book. Scamfer writes well in the first person narrative style.I did feel like it went on a bit overlong in some parts. However, this feeling may be more a product of it being one of the first I've read on my Kindle. Those tiny pages made feel like I "flipped" pages more than the actual text.My biggest complaint, however, is an oddity. I think the people ate too sloppily for those in the lower nobility of this medieval rendition of England. Silly, huh? I don't think it's because they might very well have been such slobs dining-wise, but I think Otto dwelt too long on their messiness. Everyone is constantly dribbling food and drink. After awhile it began to annoy me.That's not much reason for not liking the book. Otherwise, it's a solid but predictable tale.I'm glad that Winston sobered up and hope it's for the rest of his life. He certainly went through a lot to get to the point of understanding his weakness for drink.I would give this only 3 stars since I liked it but wasn't blown away. However, I'll add a star for the message of sobriety done in a non-preachy way.Overall, a good job.

  • Sharon
    2019-01-03 20:43

    “It (Alcohol) brings out the devil in some men and takes their soul away,” Emery answered staunchly. “I’ve seen many a good man ravaged by the drink.”Winston is a disgraceful alcoholic (or drinkwater) and presumed murderer of his father, Lord Tabor. Cyrus Everett is Lord Tabor’s bailiff who falsely accuses Winston of murdering his father and almost murders Winston as well. However, Winston is taken in by an old man, Emery, who nurses him back to health and teaches him how to defend himself with a sword.The story is predictable showing how Winston learns to stay away from the drink, becomes a knight and plans his revenge against Cyrus who is wreaking havoc on Winston’s family and village. I normally enjoy medieval tales, but I just did not like the main character and it spoiled the whole story for me. I found Winston to be a fool, even when he became a knight and I didn’t think he deserved the lordship or the girl he professed to love because I felt that the men who helped him did most of the work for him.All in all I found the story and the characters to be quite boring.

  • Scott
    2018-12-29 20:35

    This is an intriguing concept for a book: A medieval knight struggling with a problem with sobriety. Unfortunately, the story is told in a way that is pretty much "stand and deliver" - every scene involves characters telling exactly what and why they're doing it. (The opening scene involves the villain "monologuing" for several pages about why he killed the hero's father.) But really, the fatal flaw of the book is that, for a story about a knight who is a disfunctional alcoholic, there is no sense of the allure of drink and alcohol. The character seems to have no problem avoiding temptation to slip back into his old, drunken ways - and on the occasions when he does, we get no sense of the emotions or sensations that were involved in his "fall from the wagon."Be aware, this is a self-published novel. As such, it's probably a good draft of a manuscript - but the finished tale of Drinkwater is still several re-writes away.

  • Aaron Meyer
    2018-12-24 21:26

    A quick and somewhat enjoyable read. There is murder, betrayal, love, and comradeship in abundance. The story is about a lords son who flunks being a knight because he loves his ale to much and his fight to become sober and a knight so that he can avenge the murder of his family. I thought that the theme about being an alcoholic and his fight to sobriety would overpower the story, to be honest it does come close to do exactly that but fortunately the story turns away from that and gets to the meat of the matter, the avenging of his family. Some of the characters are overly readable and it does take a bit from the story because you think that the other characters should be able to see their evil character when it is so obvious to the reader. But like a truly heroic tale he conquers and that is what fantasy is all about good triumphing over evil.

  • Leslie (Working for the Mandroid)
    2019-01-19 15:37

    A young nobleman, known for his love of drinking, is framed for killing his father in a drunken rage. As he attempts to regain control of his life and figure out how to take back his rightful kingdom, he learns how to survive without ale and how better his life is without it.This could have gotten really preachy really quickly, but it didn't. It's a fast read with a generally likable character. The plot, while predictable, was fun and moved quickly enough to keep me interested. The side characters were fun and everything got tied up neatly in the end. The ending did come somewhat abruptly, and I had a difficult time determining Winston's exact age until mid-way through the book someone says he can't be more than 20. Overall though, it was enjoyable and a nice dip into that time period in the UK, but nothing special.

  • Kimberly
    2019-01-12 21:28

    I received Drinkwater as a Librarything member giveaway. I like medieval fiction, which is why I requested the book. I enjoyed the book. It moved at a good pace and contained several interesting elements. Romance, adventure, swordfights, vengeance and friendship are all strong themes in this book. I enjoyed the fact that Winston continued to have a struggle and that alcoholism wasn’t presented as a problem that can have a quick fix. While the plot was at times predictable it was still a good read. I was saddened to reach the end; I could have read many more pages about Winston’s adventures.

  • Andrea Love
    2019-01-20 17:24

    A great tale of redemption. Although at times, the plot was predictable, the characters are likable and the flow of the story is involving. We follow Winston, a disgraced former knight-in-training as he tries to clear his name, while at the same time dealing with alcoholism. He encounters others along this path, and is taught valuable lessons in sobriety, chivalry, responsibility, honesty, loyalty and forgiveness. This story is well written and very much worth the read.

  • Stephanie Lindsay Hagen
    2019-01-08 19:32

    Drinkwater is a simple, heartwarming tale of love and redemption. Anyone who has battled addictions will find strength and hope in this story.Otto Scamfer is not preachy, which is a good thing and his writing flows well. He deals with failure and doubt and ultimately success in slaying the demon. Drinkwater is a good story which I thoroughly enjoyed and which kept my interest.

  • Matt Kelland
    2019-01-21 21:43

    The character was interesting - a knight battling alcoholism - but the story was predictable and the writing felt clumsy. He had some great descriptive passages, but the characterization was flat, and for a book that depends so much on the main character's personal journey, that's a big problem.

  • Darcy Stewart
    2019-01-05 21:21

    This book was good for the most part. It had an interesting plot. I did feel it did go overboard in some parts. It was very exciting to read. If it was a big book I would have slapped it down. He didn't butcher the book by putting too many adjectives.

  • Anne Miller
    2019-01-12 15:36

    This was a very engaging and enjoyable story. The main character shows extraordinary personal growth over the course of the story. Adventure, love, betrayal and vengeance, this tale has it all!

  • Stephanie Cover2CoverBlog
    2019-01-09 21:48

    Drinkwater is a tale about a knight and how he overcomes problems with drinking and family. Told in first person, this was a great story. A little slow moving at first but very good.