Read Know Yourself, Forget Yourself: Five Truths to Transform Your Work, Relationships, and Everyday Life by Marc Lesser Online

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We all yearn for clear-cut answers to life’s problems, yet we rarely get them. Formulas fail and contradictions mount. In Know Yourself, Forget Yourself, executive coach and mindfulness teacher Marc Lesser shows that understanding and embracing the points where life feels most confusing, most contradictory can lead us to more satisfaction and joy.Lesser provides clear guidWe all yearn for clear-cut answers to life’s problems, yet we rarely get them. Formulas fail and contradictions mount. In Know Yourself, Forget Yourself, executive coach and mindfulness teacher Marc Lesser shows that understanding and embracing the points where life feels most confusing, most contradictory can lead us to more satisfaction and joy.Lesser provides clear guidance and simple practices for embracing five central paradoxes in life and navigating them to increase our effectiveness and happiness. Influenced by the revolutionary mindfulness and emotional intelligence trainings he helped develop at Google, Know Yourself, Forget Yourself is a profound book about cultivating the emotional skills to understand the right path through difficulties and challenges....

Title : Know Yourself, Forget Yourself: Five Truths to Transform Your Work, Relationships, and Everyday Life
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9781608680818
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 288 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Know Yourself, Forget Yourself: Five Truths to Transform Your Work, Relationships, and Everyday Life Reviews

  • Katrina Sark
    2018-12-30 16:40

    p.19 – Meanwhile, paradox can point to a radical clarity. My hope is that this book will help you see that with paradox comes a kind of clarity that is more accurate, more true, more clear than clear, than what we usually accept at face value. p.209 – Everything is beautiful and, simultaneously, everything is already broken. This is the truth of impermanence. We don’t like to look at the world in this way. We want to hold on to and protect everything we love, and to discard or turn away from everything that is broken. When something breaks, or a person leaves us or someone dies, we are completely upset, and we want to move away from the experience of loss as quickly as possible. Loss reminds us that the world isn’t a safe place, so we try to protect the things we still possess more diligently; we hold on to relationships more tightly. We become stressed, paranoid, out of balance. p.250 - In the book The Social Animal, New York Times writer David Brooks cites a research statistic that “being part of a small group that meets monthly brings more personal happiness than having your salary doubled.”

  • Bassaidai88
    2019-01-06 15:46

    While this book will probably be beneficial for the majority of readers who are interested in this subject matter, it was only OK with me. The part I didn't like was where the author discusses the "imposter syndrome" which is a fear people have who do think that they do not deserve their success. After reading the entire book, it appears to me that this may be the case with this author. I say this because even though the author has studied Zen and lived in a Zen community for many years, I do not believe the author to be enlightened/awakened. This is evident is his interpretation of a number of Zen master teachings which are rationale interpretations but miss the boat on the real underlying meaning. It was then apparent that the author does not have an awakened mind. How can one profess to enlighten others if they are not themselves enlightened? At best the author is life coach teaching others how to de-stress and appears to be far from a Zen spiritual master. If you read it in that context then the book is OK and no better or worse than the other motivational gurus such as Stephen Covey. But if you want insights into Zen go elsewhere.

  • Barbara Newhall
    2019-01-21 17:55

    Lots to ponder in this well-written book by a Zen teacher and executive consultant with many years' experience as a Buddhist monk turned entrepreneur.Lesser explains many classic Buddhist concepts in a fresh way -- impermanence, grasping, etc. Even more interestingly, he applies Buddhist principles to life in the workplace. Very useful for cubicle dwellers, but especially useful for managers and executives.Since I'm not in a workplace right now -- I'm writing my book in the solitude of my own home -- much of this book doesn't apply to me. Otherwise, I probably would have slapped another star onto my rating.Here's a link to a story that Lesser's book inspired: http://barbarafalconernewhall.com/201...

  • ellen
    2019-01-18 22:39

    Had I not already read a bunch of books about mindfulness and meditation I might find this book more interesting than I did. There were some helpful tidbits about how to relate practice to work and life, but overall this book was just ok.

  • Debbie Thompson
    2019-01-20 14:35

    Thoroughly enjoyed this book. Very insightful. This is a do the work book and reap the benefits.

  • Nagapriya
    2019-01-10 22:54

    You can read my review here:http://www.wildmind.org/blogs/book-re...

  • Pamela Blunt
    2019-01-15 18:31

    Another great book from Mark Lesser. I love the paradoxical nature of which he writes. Again, succinct, warm and packed with wisdom in a small space.